Sir Terry Farrell gives backing to Vauxhall High Street plans

TfL are also in favour, but whatever happened to the bus station?

28 Oct 2014

London Evening Standard (West End Final A)

Jonathan Prynn Consumer Business Editor

Goodbye to ‘nastiest’ gyratory in London

Designer of MI6 headquarters turns his attention to Vauxhall ‘black hole’

A NEW masterplan to turn Vauxhall, one of of central London’s worst traffic “black holes”, back into a living town centre has been unveiled.

The scheme would help remove the blight c au s e d by the three -lane gyratory system around Vauxhall’s Tube, rail and bus stations, which has been described as “the nastiest in London”.

The “Vauxhall Cross” plan drawn up by architects PLP has planning permission for two towers of 140 metres and 115 metres overlooking the MI6 building there.

Its proposals also feature 291 apartments including 50 affordable homes, a 180-bed hotel, offices, shops, restaurants and a cinema as well as a new public square. An alternative plan could increase the height of the towers to 170 metres and 140 metres.

In an introduction to the brochure for the scheme https://vivavauxhall.files.wordpress.com/2014/10/lnl140062-en-brochure-1-1.pdf  urban planner Sir Terry Farrell — who designed the MI6 building at Vauxhall — said: “Our plans anticipate that this large and complex traffic roundabout will, in due course, be successfully di smantled to t he benefit of the whole of Vauxhall.” The projec t , which has the backing of Transpor t for London, is being ma r k e t e d o n b e h a l f o f p r o p e r t y company Wendover Investments by estate agents Knight Frank for £65 million.

Charlie Dugdale from Knight Frank said: “Vauxhall Cross will be at the very forefront of the local Nine Elms opportunity area. It is the gateway to the masterplan and all other schemes within Nine Elms are likely to be positively affected by its success.”

Extracts from the brochure:

“… urban planner Sir Terry Farrell — who designed the MI6 building at Vauxhall — said: “Our plans anticipate that this large and complex traffic roundabout will, in due course, be successfully di smantled to t he benefit of the whole of Vauxhall.” The projec t , which has the backing of Transpor t for London, is being ma r k e t e d o n b e h a l f o f p r o p e r t y company Wendover Investments by estate agents Knight Frank for £65 million.”

The Kylun developers are talking about a two sided high street (without a bus station), adding a podium and increasing the height to 170 m:

 “The planning context has evolved since the extant permission was granted. The emerging Local Plan builds on the character area for Vauxhall Cross set out in the Vauxhall SPD. It proposes a new town centre focused on Bondway with two-sided High Street frontage linking to a new public square to the north of the site. The Statutory Development Plan identifies an upper building height threshold of 150 metres (10 metres higher than the extant scheme) but there could be strong arguments to challenge this limitation on the Vauxhall Cross site.

LOW RISE PODIUM

“The PLP scheme responds to the setting of the site, both at ground plane and at skyline. At ground the proposal creates a well-defined and active frontage around the site. At high level, two slender towers are placed into the two key corners of the site. A taller tower is located in the northern corner, while a lower tower is located in the south-west corner of the site. The towers are linked by a low-rise podium that defines the perimeter of the site.”

HEIGHT

“Scheme 1 – ‘Base Scheme’ The Stretched Scheme explores the possibility of increasing the height of buildings beyond the heights established by the extant scheme. The concept proposes a maximum height of 170 metres for Tower A and 140 metres for Tower B (the height of Tower A in the Base Scheme). Whilst the Statutory Development Plan identifies an upper building height threshold of 150 metres, this has been breached on a number of occasions (One Nine Elms at 200 metres, The Tower at 181 metres, New Bondway at 170 metres, and Vauxhall Square at 164 metres).”

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